Saturday, November 28th

Tim and John welcome the Warwick Rowers to the studio. The celebrated oarsmen are probably best known around the world for their naked calendars, which help fund their sport, and enables them to do their own outreach program to young people called Sport Allies, which promotes LGBT inclusion in team sport. In the second hour Aunt Barbara reminds us of Holiday Etiquette. Join us Saturday at 11am EST.


A Eulogy for the Long, Intimate Email

When I started college in 1997, I got my first email account, as did most of my peers. Over the next four years, I sent and received countless rambling letters to friends, both off and on campus, a habit that persisted for a decade or so after graduation.

Now I can’t remember the last time I wrote or read an email of more than four or five meaty, intimate paragraphs. I can chalk up some of my letter-writing decline to my age and profession: I have a (somewhat) smaller appetite these days for Knausgaardian navel-gazing, and expend more energy writing for work. Full Story »

The Financial Resolution that 62% of Americans Really Ought to be Making

A new Bankrate study finds that most of us are missing a key piece of our financial well-being: emergency savings.

It’s not just your body you should be resolving to get fit this year.

Look beyond the mirror and into your savings account. If it’s as lean as you wish your figure was, know that you’re in a troubling majority.

Only 38% of Americans have enough money in their savings accounts to pay for unexpected expenses such as a $1,000 emergency room visit or a $500 car repair, according to a report by Bankrate.com released Wednesday. Full Story »

Stuart Elliott Takes Buyout as NYT Continues to Lose Top Media and Advertising Reporters

The giant sucking sound you might be hearing from Manhattan this week is probably the vacuum of media and marketing insight being created by New York Times buyouts.

Stuart Elliott, the newspaper’s longest-serving advertising columnist, has announced he will be “taking part in the (generous) buyout offer the Times has made to longtime employees.” After more than 23 years in the role, his last day will be Dec. 19.

“For many, many years covering advertising, marketing and media, I’ve written about people [who] are ‘leaving to pursue other interests’ or leaving ‘to explore career opportunities’ or even to ‘spend more time with (his/her) family,’” Elliott said in a Facebook announcement about his retirement. “Now I am going to be one of those people. ... It is scary, and exciting, and I want to thank everyone who has helped me all these years in tackling this demanding job.” Full Story »

Fare Thee Well, My Pen

The pen is dead. It was murdered by the finger.

I first realized this last week when my girlfriend asked to borrow a pen to sign the back of one of those paper check things.

“Sure,” I replied, picking up my laptop bag to rummage inside. I pulled out a succession of rectangular-shaped gadgets, but there was no pen to be found.

“Hmm, maybe we have one upstairs,” I said as we both began a detective-like search for anything that resembled a vessel for ink. We scoured the home office, kitchen drawers, bedrooms, even looking through our cars. But again, no pen. Full Story »

A Life Beyond ‘Do What You Love’

Student advisees often come to my office, rubbing their hands together, furrowing their brows and asking me to walk along with them as they ponder life after graduation. Just the other day, a sophomore made an appointment because he was worrying about whether he should become a doctor or a philosophy professor. A few minutes later, he nervously confessed that he had also thought of giving stand-up comedy a whirl.

As an occupational counselor, my kneejerk reaction has always been, “What are you most passionate about?” Sometimes I‘d even go into a sermonette about how it is important to distinguish between what we think we are supposed to love and what we really love.

But is “do what you love” wisdom or malarkey? Full Story »


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